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    • Despite the continuing decline in a suite of farmland birds across the wider landscape, a recently published paper by the GWCT and the RSPB shows that these trends can be reversed.  

      Comparing long-term bird population changes at the GWCT's Allerton Project in Leicestershire and the RSPB's Hope Farm in Cambridgeshire, the study documents the large increases in farmland bird populations at both sites and considers the changes in management driving those changes.  The study highlights the importance of habitat provision, especially invertebrate-rich foraging habitats during summer.

      Insect rich foraging areas are of key importance during the summer for farmland birds

      Insect rich foraging areas are of key importance during the summer for farmland birds c. Diane White

      The study shows that targeted evidence-based habitat management can have large positive impacts on farmland bird populations, and how declines can be reversed if the right habitats are put in and managed in the right places.  In addition, both farms continue to be profitable farming businesses as well as havens for wildlife, showing that that commercial farming and wildlife conservation can go hand in hand.

      To read the full report see here